Colonia Uraguay
Up Caracas Venezuela

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Colonia Uruguay: This example of tiled sidewalks around town is typical. Every block includes sections with missing or broken tiles.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out on the Rio de la Plata from the bank near the second hotel I used for several nights, the $87 Radisson.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking down the main street through town near the hotel I used for the first night.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out on the muddy Rio de la Plata from the bank near the historic section of the town.


Colonia Uruguay: One of the popular places to enjoy a cup of coffee while watching activities on the Rio de la Plata.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out on the Rio de la Plata; a fisherman prepares his line.


Colonia Uruguay: Sailboats at anchor in the harbor near the Yacht Club.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking down the main street into the city.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking down one of the side streets off the main street near the hotel.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking down one of the side streets off the main street near the hotel.


Colonia Uruguay: Wanting another photograph of people drinking Yerba Matte I paused to admire this lady and asked to take a picture of her cup and metal straw.


Colonia Uruguay: Draw bridge entrance to the walled fort. Just off to the left out of the picture a young man dressed in old Spanish attire stood adding to the historical ambiance.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out through the draw bridge entrance to the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking into the fort compound from the draw bridge entrance to the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: The lighthouse still sits among the old structures along streets near the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: The lighthouse still sits among the old structures along streets near the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: The lighthouse still sits among the old structures along streets near the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: A portion of remaining old structures along streets near the main plaza.


Colonia Uruguay: A portion of remaining old structures along jagged cobblestone streets near the main plaza.

16-20 March 2006

Greetings from Colonia Uraguay,

After leaving Montevideo I made a brief visit to Colonia Uruguay, an old smuggler's port town directly across the river from Buenos Aires. Cobblestone streets and sidewalks covered with damaged tiles make for uneven perambulation. Mosquitoes are hungry all the time and seem to favor California cuisine. Each evening as I prepare for bed I must go hunting for the little beasties. Last night I killed two before dinner time... their dinner time and avoided being awakened by the common early morning itch. To make matters worse, some other more aggressive insect competes with mosquitoes for dining rights. This particular flying carnivore leaves a larger more painful welt. 

My first hotel, the Colonia Esperanza set me back $25... including what people call breakfast in this part of the world. A South American hotel breakfast guarantees you will be really hungry by noon. The problem is that midday meals are rarely eaten before about 2PM. Fortunately, I usually have a stash of emergency chocolate bars in my pack... and a bottle of water. The $87 Radisson Hotel I found for the second night sits over the bank of a shallow bay created by the river. After watching many boats navigating the bay imagine my surprise when two small boys walked across the entire kilometer wide bay; the water can not be more than two feet deep, at least where they walked! I am amused to note my very poor Spanish is now almost always better than the English possessed by waitresses and other service staff.  

Peace

Fred L Bellomy

 


Colonia Uruguay: Entrance to the $87 Radisson Hotel where I stayed for four nights. It rained a lot, but the hotel had a decent Internet terminal... though always busy when it rained!


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out on the Rio de la Plata from the bank near the hotel I used for several nights.


Colonia Uruguay: Map of the harbor area hangs near the Yacht Club.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out on the Rio de la Plata; a fisherman prepares his line.


Colonia Uruguay: Map of the old historic section of the city hangs on a building along the main street.


Colonia Uruguay: Sailboats at anchor in the harbor near the Yacht Club.


Colonia Uruguay: Sailboats at anchor in the harbor near the Yacht Club.


Colonia Uruguay: Old historical map of the river delta.


Colonia Uruguay: Information posted near the old historical map of the harbor.


Colonia Uruguay: Draw bridge entrance to the walled fort. Just off to the left out of the picture a young man dressed in old Spanish attire stood adding to the historical ambiance.


Colonia Uruguay: Sign near the draw bridge entrance to the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: A portion of remaining old structures along streets near the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: A portion of remaining old structures along streets near the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: A portion of remaining old structures along streets near the main plaza.


Colonia Uruguay: A portion of remaining old structures along streets near the main plaza.


Colonia Uruguay: This is the Parrilla restaurant used by a majority of tour groups. The quality is poor and the prices high. After all, the place only needs satisfy the tour operators budget requirements. I ate here in desperation the evening I arrived in a prolonged downpour. The $25 Hotel Esperanza sits immediately next to it.


Colonia Uruguay: Plaque commemorating the restoration of the old historical part of the city.


Colonia Uruguay: This is one of the transport buses used to get passengers to the Buquibus ferry terminal. The ferry's name caused me some confusion when asking directions for the "ferry" as all responses included "bus!"

 

 
END

 

 

 

 


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out of the Radisson Hotel dining room window across the muddy bay formed by the Rio de la Plata. One morning I watched two elementary school age boys walk across the entire bay; it is not very deep!


Colonia Uruguay: Looking out on the Rio de la Plata from the bank near the hotel I used for several nights.


Colonia Uruguay: Sailboats at anchor in the harbor near the Yacht Club. The twin bell towers of the Cathedral can be seen in the background.


Colonia Uruguay: This tower sits over a popular tourist restaurant near the boat harbor.


Colonia Uruguay: Entrance to the $25 Hotel Esperanza next to the tourist restaurant, both of which I used after arriving in the middle of a rain storm. Esperanza is "hope" in Spanish and hoped for better quality than I got in either.


Colonia Uruguay: One of the docks jutting out into the Rio de la Plata near the boat harbor.


Colonia Uruguay: Boats at anchor in the harbor near the Yacht Club.


Colonia Uruguay: Sailboats at anchor in the harbor near the Yacht Club.


Colonia Uruguay: These two paramedics sat near their ambulance waiting for the next call. I asked about the Yerba Matte paraphernalia and they obliged me with demonstrations. The wooden cup is filled with the crushed leaves and boiling hot water is added from the thermos as necessary. A metal straw fitted with a strainer at the intake end is used to drink the bitter beverage... often with sugar added, they assured me.


Colonia Uruguay: These two paramedics sat near their ambulance waiting for the next call. I asked about the Yerba Matte paraphernalia and they obliged me with demonstrations. The wooden cup is filled with the crushed leaves and boiling water is added as necessary. A metal straw fitted with a strainer at the intake end is used to drink the bitter beverage... often with sugar added, they assured me.


Colonia Uruguay: Plaques explaining the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: A sign explaining the history of the walled fort.


Colonia Uruguay: A canon still threatens would be attackers atop the fort's walls.


Colonia Uruguay: Diagram of the fort compound.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking into the main plaza.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking into the main plaza.


Colonia Uruguay: Looking into the main plaza.


Colonia Uruguay: The cathedral located, as usual next to the main Plaza in the background.


Colonia Uruguay: Inside the Buquibus Ferry from Colonia Uruguay to Buenos Aires. All exit and entry immigration formalities are handled as passengers board the ferry.


Colonia Uruguay: Inside the Buquibus Ferry from Colonia Uruguay to Buenos Aires. All exit and entry immigration formalities are handled as passengers board the ferry.


Colonia Uruguay: Inside the Buquibus Ferry from Colonia Uruguay to Buenos Aires. All exit and entry immigration formalities are handled as passengers board the ferry.


Colonia Uruguay: The cathedral located, as usual next to the main Plaza in town.

 

Reference photo: author
 August 2002
 
 

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